After Defending BLM Riots, MSNBC Ready to Jail Cuba Protesters


Channeling the radical socialists of Black Lives Matter – who have voiced their support for the brutal communist regime in Cuba – MSNBC on Thursday complained that Cuban-American protesters who blocked traffic in Miami were not arrested. This coming from the same left-wing cable network that defended violent BLM riots as peaceful even as communities across the country were set on fire.

“Meanwhile, here in the United States, as supporters of the Cuban protesters in Miami continue their demonstrations, it’s raising some new scrutiny of a law that Florida Governor Ron DeSantis signed back in April….in response to the Black Lives Matter protests,” anchor Craig Melvin announced late in the 11:00 a.m. ET hour.

 

 

Reporting live from Miami, correspondent Kerry Sanders briefly explained the controversy being pushed by Black Lives Matter activists:

Well, the law was brought into effect in response to Black Lives Matter. And it said in the 61 pages really clearly that if people went on to a major thoroughfare, a street, a highway, and closed it down, they would be subject to arrest and it would be a felony arrest. So now let’s take a look at the pictures this week on the Palmetto Highway in Miami, a major thoroughfare, which was shut down for more than six hours by those Cuban-Americans in support of those on the island. What was not applied was this anti-riot law. And so the question then came up among those who are aligned with Black Lives Matter or those who are just civil rights leaders that felt that, “Well, when that law was passed, we were suspect about why it was being passed and now we don’t see it being applied evenly.”

A soundbite ran of attorney Benjamin Crump wailing that it was “hypocrisy 101.”

Obviously no lawful protest should ever block traffic or endanger public safety and the local authorities would have had every right to arrest the few dozen demonstrators who shut down the intersection shown on screen. However, rather than go talk to the Miami Police Department about how the situation was handled, MSNBC immediately rushed to blame Florida Republican Governor and potential 2024 presidential candidate Ron DeSantis instead.

Sanders read a statement from the Governor’s office: “Under preexisting Florida law, blocking or obstructing a roadway without a proper permit has long been illegal. It’s puzzling that some media outlets are attempting to claim otherwise.” In response, the reporter feigned ignorance of anyone in press having an agenda: “Of course, this is us as reporters reporting what others are saying. This is not an agenda of any reporter, at least that I can see here.”

Wrapping up the report, Sanders lectured:

But for now, you can see the conflict where some people say on the one hand the law was passed and was passed in response to Black Lives Matter. But when you have the first opportunity to apply the law as roads are closed down, major thoroughfares, for more than six hours, the law was not used.

Clearly left-wing activists are eager to seize on this issue to trash DeSantis, which is why the topic showed up on the air of MSNBC.

This obvious effort to do BLM’s bidding was brought to viewers by Hyundai and Dove. You can fight back by letting these advertisers know what you think of them sponsoring such content.

Here is a full transcript of the July 15 report:

11:52 AM ET

CRAIG MELVIN: Also this morning, Cuba’s president again speaking out in the wake of the largest protests that nation has seen in a quarter century. He acknowledges his government’s shortcomings in handling food shortages. It’s been one of the driving factors of the demonstrations. Meanwhile, here in the United States, as supporters of the Cuban protesters in Miami continue their demonstrations, it’s raising some new scrutiny of a law that Florida Governor Ron DeSantis signed back in April. That law was in response to the Black Lives Matter protests. NBC’s Kerry Sanders is in Miami. So, Kerry, explain the law to us and how it could factor into the protests there.

KERRY SANDERS: Well, the law was brought into effect in response to Black Lives Matter. And it said in the 61 pages really clearly that if people went on to a major thoroughfare, a street, a highway, and closed it down, they would be subject to arrest and it would be a felony arrest. So now let’s take a look at the pictures this week on the Palmetto Highway in Miami, a major thoroughfare, which was shut down for more than six hours by those Cuban-Americans in support of those on the island. What was not applied was this anti-riot law. And so the question then came up among those who are aligned with Black Lives Matter or those who are just civil rights leaders that felt that, “Well, when that law was passed, we were suspect about why it was being passed and now we don’t see it being applied evenly.” Listen to what attorney Ben Crump had to say.

BENJAMIN CRUMP: It completely contradicts what they said when they passed this law, that it wasn’t about Black Lives Matter but it was a public safety issue. And now we look at what’s going on in Miami, where they’re shutting down major interstates but yet there is no enforcement of the law. It’s hypocrisy 101.

SANDERS: Florida Governor Ron DeSantis sending out a statement saying in part that, “Under preexisting Florida law, blocking or obstructing a roadway without a proper permit has long been illegal. It’s puzzling that some media outlets are attempting to claim otherwise.” Of course, this is us as reporters reporting what others are saying. This is not an agenda of any reporter, at least that I can see here.

But most importantly here is the Governor said that there was already an existing law, but because he sent out a statement, I couldn’t then directly ask him in a question, well, if there was an existing law, why was there need for the anti-riot law to begin with?

Now we may have an opportunity to talk to the Governor later today because he’ll be here in Miami holding a news conference where he may, just a short distance from where I am, address this issue. But for now, you can see the conflict where some people say on the one hand the law was passed and was passed in response to Black Lives Matter. But when you have the first opportunity to apply the law as roads are closed down, major thoroughfares, for more than six hours, the law was not used. Back to you.

MELVIN: Kerry Sanders on the ground for us there in Miami. Kerry, thank you.



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