MSNBC's Hasan Cries for Cuomo: ‘Sadder Day for Democracy;’ Only ‘Consequences’ for Dems


MSNBC host Mehdi Hasan was more upset at Republicans than Governor Andrew Cuomo, on Tuesday, calling Cuomo’s resignation a “sad day for the Democrat party” but a “ a sadder day for American democracy” because of a “double standard” for Democrats. 

Filling in for All In host Chris Hayes, Hasan complained that Democrats embroiled in sexual scandals get punished but Republicans allegedly get away with it. 

One rather important lesson from today’s shock resignation from Andrew Cuomo is the fact that the Democratic Party is still willing to take action against alleged offenders in its midst; unlike, wait for it, the other great political party in this country. I mean, Republicans have been all over the Andrew Cuomo story. But have they looked in the mirror recently?

Hasan gave a laundry list of examples from Supreme Court justices Clarence Thomas and Brett Kavanaugh to Congressman Matt Gaetz before whining that today was a sad day for democracy:

So yes, today is a sad day for the Democratic Party. One of their stars, a man they were considering as a presidential candidate just a year ago, resigned in disgrace. But you could say, it’s a sadder day for American democracy because it’s a reminder that there are only consequences, there is only accountability for Democrats in our system. Not for Republicans.

 

 

The hack journalist then invited on disgraced former Democrat congresswoman Katie Hill and New York Magazine’s Rebecca Traister to discuss the supposed double standard. 

Hasan and Traister claimed Cuomo was acting like Donald Trump before Hasan asked Hill how she felt about the “Democrat-Republican double standard:”

TRAISTER: [I] think he is more Trumpian and not necessarily the responsible Democratic official taking responsibility for his actions. So yeah, I can see a future with Andrew Cuomo who is absolutely wedded to his own authority and his own power. 

 HASAN: I think your reporting on this does stand up the idea he is Trumpian. The guess the point I was making is whether or not he went willingly or he was a good soldier, in the end he saw there were votes for impeachment and the pressure coming his way. That hasn’t happened in the Republican party. We had two impeachment trials and Donald Trump got through both of them. Katie, you have a unique perspective on this given the way you ended up resigning from congress. What do you make of  the Democratic-Republican double standard when it comes to holding their bad actors accountable? 

 Hill agreed that Republicans were far behind Democrats in responding appropriately to allegations of sexual harassment and assault. Hill undermined her own argument though by touting how she did the right thing resigning because no one in her party was calling for it:

KATIE HILL: [N]ow we finally after decades have seen the shift on the democratic side. But you know, Rebecca’s right It doesn’t mean it’s going to immediately go away. We have to be constantly on the lookout for what are — are we holding ourselves accountable? That’s one of the big reasons I decided to resign. I can’t stand here and say that one thing is right and make sure my actions — I need to make sure my actions hold up to that. You know, It was a tough discussion. Ultimately I didn’t have people — it was my own decision. It wasn’t people who were calling for it. I think that’s a big difference and one we see Republicans not even coming close to. 

HASAN:  I think it’s one of the things that frustrates American voters, the lack of accountability in public life…

The media certainly wasn’t calling for Hill’s resignation either. They spent months trying to rehab the disgraced Democrat, calling her a victim of sexism and a #MeToo double standard.

MSNBC attacking Republicans to defend Cuomo was paid for by sponsor Claritin, contact them at the Conservatives fight back page here. 

MSNBC’s All In

August 10, 2021

8:05:22 p.m.

(…)

MEHDI HASAN: Democrats put pressure on one of their own, a Democratic attorney general opened up multiple investigations into the Democratic governor. Members of his own party finally head him accountable. And it worked.

Now look, I believe top members of the Democratic Party nationally and in New York should have to answer for how long they knew about Cuomo’s actions and whether they turned a blind eye to them. And as I say, eventually, when they turned up the heat, it worked.

It also worked with the previous two Democratic governors of New York; Elliott Spitzer, who resigned amid a sex worker scandal, and David Patterson, who bowed out in the face of allegations that he abused his office. And it worked for the former Democratic attorney general of New York, Eric Snyderman, who resigned after four women accused him of physical abuse.

So, one rather important lesson from today’s shock resignation from Andrew Cuomo is the fact that the Democratic Party is still willing to take action against alleged offenders in its midst; unlike, wait for it, the other great political party in this country. I mean, Republicans have been all over the Andrew Cuomo story. But have they looked in the mirror recently?

Just take former Missouri Republican Governor Eric Greitens who resigned in 2018 amidst an ethics probe, two criminal charges, reports had an affair, and allegations of blackmail. He’s now running again, this time for the senate, and is the likely frontrunner to replace retiring GOP Senator Roy Blunt.

There’s Republican Congressman Jim Jordan of Ohio who’s faced multiple allegations that he turned a blind eye to sexual abuse by the Ohio State wrestling team physician while Jordan was the assistant coach. And yet, Republicans continue to stand by him, even choosing him to be their ranking member on the House Judiciary Committee.

We have even seen this on the Supreme Court. Clarence Thomas was confirmed despite Anita Hill’s accusation of sexual harassment. So was Brett Kavanaugh more recently after Christine Blasey Ford’s accusation of sexual assault. Not a single Republican voted no on Kavanagh’s confirmation.

Congressman Matt Gaetz of Florida is currently – currently under investigation by the Department of Justice over where he had a sexual relationship with a 17-year-old girl and paid for her to travel with him. Only one of his Republican colleagues, Congressman Kinzinger, has called on him to resign. And Gaetz remains in office. And on his committees.

(…)

So yes, today is a sad day for the Democratic Party. One of their stars, a man they were considering as a presidential candidate just a year ago, resigned in disgrace. But you could say, it’s a sadder day for American democracy because it’s a reminder that there are only consequences, there is only accountability for Democrats in our system. Not for Republicans.

(…)

HASAN: Where are we now in terms of the me too movement, in terms of standing up to sexual misconduct in public life? Did today move us forward? 

KATIE HILL:  Look, I think it’s a really important line in the sand that has been drawn. We have been able to say, this is not going to be tolerated by people in the highest positions of power, especially if you want votes from women, if you want votes from people who make up the democratic base. I think that’s meaningful but it’s not enough…

HASAN: It is it an epidemic. You are right to talk about the need to move the conversation forward. Rebecca, itt’s also a political day, a very political day. So let me ask you a political question. Is this the end of the legendary Cuomo political dynasty in New York? People today are talking about him running again in the future if he can dodge getting impeached and barred from office. 

REBECCA TRAISTER: I was going to say, when you pointed to the fact that Donald Trump may in fact have a future with his party, I don’t think it’s at all unthinkable that Andrew Cuomo will continue to have — in my reporting I found and I think lots of people would agree to have a lot of Trumpian characteristics…I think he is more trumpian and not necessarily the responsible democratic official taking responsibility for his actions. So yeah, I can see a future with Andrew Cuomo who is absolutely wedded to his own authority and his own power. 

 HASAN: I think your reporting on this does stand up the idea he is trumpian. The guess the point I was making is whether or not he went willingly or he was a good soldier, in the end he saw there were votes for impeachment and the pressure coming his way. That hasn’t happened in the Republican party. We had two impeachment trials and Donald Trump got through both of them. Katie, you have a unique perspective on this given the way you ended up resigning from congress. What do you make of  the Democratic-Republican double standard when it comes to holding their bad actors accountable? 

KATIE HILL: I think we see now, there is absolutely no comparison. The fact that — you went through it all. The fact that Matt Gaetz is still there, still on his committees. The fact that — it’s not an issue. It’s excused. It’s basically pushed under the rug. That’s the same thing we have seen for so long for all people in power on both sides. Now we finally after decades have seen the shift on the democratic side. But you know, Rebecca’s right It doesn’t mean it’s going to immediately go away. We have to be constantly on the lookout for what are — are we holding ourselves accountable? That’s one of the big reasons I decided to resign. I can’t stand here and say that one thing is right and make sure my actions — I need to make sure my actions hold up to that. You know, It was a tough discussion. Ultimately I didn’t have people — it was my own decision. It wasn’t people who were calling for it. I think that’s a big difference and one we see Republicans not even coming close to. 
 

HASAN:  I think it’s one of the things that frustrates American voters, the lack of accountability in public life…



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