Nets Hail Radical Pro-Abortion Protesters Fighting Pro-Life ‘Threat’


Following radical pro-abortion activists taking to the streets across the country on Saturday, the leftist broadcast networks quickly went to work cheering on the protesters “marching for themselves and for their daughters” and fighting against the “threat” of pro-life policies. Reporters particularly hyped the “passion” of demonstrators “calling out lawmakers and the Supreme Court.”

“Marching for themselves and for their daughters,” correspondent Raf Sanchez heralded on NBC’s Sunday Today. He gushed: “Thousands of women from coast to coast took to the streets in defense of reproductive rights.” The reporter dourly added: “Those rights, they feel, under fresh assault across the country.”

 

 

A soundbite ran of Planned Parenthood president Alexis McGill Johnson telling a crowd of supporters in Washington, D.C.: “This year alone we have seen nearly 600 restrictions introduced in 47 states. So no matter where you live, no matter where you are, this fight is at your doorstep right now!”

Sanchez described the “battle” ahead:

The front line of this new abortion battle – Texas. A restrictive new law, now enforced for a month, bans abortions once a fetal heart beat is detected….The Supreme Court letting the law go into effect without hearing arguments, sparking new fears conservative justices may soon strike down Roe vs. Wade….A struggle to defend a woman’s rights to choose. A right under threat like never before.

On ABC’s Good Morning America on Sunday, co-host Juju Chang announced: “As we know, we’ve seen lots of passion at marches from coast to coast this weekend in support of reproductive rights, as several states work to tighten restrictions on abortion.” Correspondent Faith Abubey followed by proclaiming:

They streamed into D.C.’s freedom plaza by the thousands, demanding to be heard and seen. And they were angry, holding signs, chanting, ‘My body, My choice,’ and they were calling out lawmakers and the Supreme Court to protect the rights of women to choose. And it wasn’t just here in D.C., there were more than 650 sister marches across the country from New York to California…

After playing clips of a series of pro-abortion activists expressing disgust at there being any debate over the issue, Abubey channeled more talking points: “Well, these marches come at a pivotal time for the abortion rights movement. Several rally-goers told us they were motivated to come out after seeing Texas enact its new controversial law which bans abortions around six weeks.”

She touted how “here in D.C., a roster of speakers fired up that crowd, and then they marched straight to the steps of the U.S. Supreme Court.”

Of course the vile rhetoric of those extreme speakers was completely left out of the network coverage.

On Monday’s CBS Mornings, correspondent Jan Crawford warned of the Supreme Court “taking up a host of contentious social issues, they’ve got gun rights, religious rights, and the most divisive of all, abortion.” Amid footage of the protests, the reporter sympathized: “Over the weekend, protesters left no doubt what’s at stake….The most significant challenge to Roe vs. Wade in a generation.”

Crawford saw political doom for the high court: “The case comes with the court already in the political spotlight. Polls show public opinion of the court has declined.”

These are same networks that steadfastly ignore the massive March for Life in D.C. every year. Yet, pro-abortion marches organized by radical leftists are instantly a major news event.

NBC’s cheerleading for abortion was brought to viewers by Dunkin’ Donuts, to ABC viewers by GEICO, and to CBS viewers by Lincoln. You can fight back by letting these advertisers know what you think of them sponsoring such content.

Here is a full transcript of the October 3 segment on NBC’s Sunday Today:

8:06 AM ET

HALLIE JACKSON: As a federal judge considers a Biden administration challenge to a new law in Texas that bans virtually all abortions, some women nationwide marched in protest on Saturday. NBC’s Raf Sanchez has more.

PRO-ABORTION PROTESTERS: Hands off our bodies!

RAF SANCHEZ: Marching for themselves…

PROTESTERS: My choice!

SANCHEZ: …and for their daughters.

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN A [PRO-ABORTION PROTESTER]: And we have to march and we have to organize and we have to fight.

SANCHEZ: Thousands of women from coast to coast took to the streets in defense of reproductive rights.

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN B: My body!

SANCHEZ: Those rights, they feel, under fresh assault across the country.

ALEXIS MCGILL JOHNSON [PLANNED PARENTHOOD PRESIDENT]: This year alone we have seen nearly 600 restrictions introduced in 47 states. So no matter where you live, no matter where you are, this fight is at your doorstep right now!

SANCHEZ: The front line of this new abortion battle – Texas. A restrictive new law, now enforced for a month, bans abortions once a fetal heart beat is detected. As early as the sixth week of pregnancy, before many women even know their pregnant. And it makes no exceptions for rape or incest.

The Supreme Court letting the law go into effect without hearing arguments, sparking new fears conservative justices may soon strike down Roe vs. Wade. Yesterday the largest women’s march since the day after President Trump’s inauguration.

A smaller group of anti-abortion activists also protesting. And a Republican congresswoman defending the Texas law last week.

REP. KAT CAMMACK [R-FL]: I would not be here had it not been for the very brave choice that my mother made 33 years ago.

SANCHEZ: A struggle to defend a woman’s rights to choose. A right under threat like never before. Raf Sanchez, NBC News.

Here is a full transcript of the October 3 segment on ABC’s GMA:

8:17 AM ET

JUJU CHANG: As we know, we’ve seen lots of passion at marches from coast to coast this weekend in support of reproductive rights, as several states work to tighten restrictions on abortion. ABC’s Faith Abubey is outside the Supreme Court this morning. Good morning to you, Faith.

FAITH ABUBEY: Hey, good morning to you, Juju. They streamed into D.C.’s freedom plaza by the thousands, demanding to be heard and seen. And they were angry, holding signs, chanting, “My body, My choice,” and they were calling out lawmakers and the Supreme Court to protect the rights of women to choose. And it wasn’t just here in D.C., there were more than 650 sister marches across the country from New York to California, and here’s what some of them told us.

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN A [PRO-ABORTION PROTESTER]: I can’t believe that we’re fighting this fight. Abortion care is health care, and it should be accessible to everybody.

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN B [PRO-ABORTION PROTESTER]: I am a person who lived in the pre-Roe decision, and I can’t believe I am here still fighting issues that we fought so many years ago.

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN C [PRO-ABORTION PROTESTER]: I think that we are in a time where our bodies and our bodily autonomy is absolutely under attack and it really does take all of us.

ABUBEY: Well, these marches come at a pivotal time for the abortion rights movement. Several rally-goers told us they were motivated to come out after seeing Texas enact its new controversial law which bans abortions around six weeks. The Justice Department is suing to block it, but there is a growing number of states now enacting similar laws. The Supreme Court is scheduled to hear arguments in a case from Mississippi in December that many fear could essentially overturn that landmark Roe v. Wade decision protecting a woman’s right to choose.

Now here in D.C., a roster of speakers fired up that crowd, and then they marched straight to the steps of the U.S. Supreme Court.

Groups of counter-protesters also showed up to say they support the rights of the unborn. Even the anti-abortion group March for Life tweeted that the women’s march doesn’t speak for the millions of women out there who support and value human life.

WHIT JOHNSON: Alright, Faith Abubey there in Washington. Thank you so much.

Here is a full transcript of the October 4 segment on CBS Mornings:

7:07 AM ET

GAYLE KING: Across from the street from the Capitol, the Supreme Court begins a new term today. Court will be held in person for the first time since March of last year. The justices have a very controversial docket in front of them, including cases that challenge a longstanding abortion ruling. Jan Crawford is at the Supreme Court with a look at what’s ahead. Jan, good morning to you. First Monday in October, that’s what it means, court’s in session. Hello to you.

JAN CRAWFORD: Yeah, you know, there’s kind of like this first day of school vibe up here today, Gayle. And let me tell you, a lot has happened since the court last heard arguments in person. We’ve got a new justice, Amy Coney Barrett, and that’s really helped shift the court to the right. They’re taking up a host of contentious social issues, they’ve got gun rights, religious rights, and the most divisive of all, abortion.

PRO-ABORTION PROTESTERS: This is what democracy looks like!

CRAWFORD: Over the weekend, protesters left no doubt what’s at stake.

PRO-ABORTION PROTESTERS: My choice! My choice!

CRAWFORD: The most significant challenge to Roe vs. Wade in a generation. A case asking the justices to uphold Mississippi’s ban on abortions after 15 weeks.

SHANNON BREWER [ABORTION CLINIC DIRECTOR]: This is the only clinic in – in the state of Mississippi.

CRAWFORD: Shannon Brewer is director of the clinic in Jackson.

BREWER: I’ve been here through a lot of different laws that we fought, but this one, this is the one that I can honestly say worries me more than any of them.

CRAWFORD: Justices will hear arguments in the case in December. With Justice Amy Coney Barrett replacing liberal icon Ruth Bader Ginsburg, abortion opponents hope this court could finally overturn Roe, the 1973 case that said abortion was a constitutional right.

Some states across the country already are preparing for the ruling, with mostly conservative states ready to outlaw or greatly restrict abortion if the court sides with Mississippi while some liberal ones are passing laws to guarantee that in their states abortion still would be available.

The case comes with the court already in the political spotlight. Polls show public opinion of the court has declined. And there are other contentious cases that surely will divide the justices. In November, the court takes up a major gun rights case challenging a New York law that limits who can carry a concealed weapon for self-defense. It also will decide a religious rights case, whether a tuition assistance program in Maine that bans state money from going to religious schools amounts to discrimination.

Now this week, the court’s going to be one justice short, on the bench anyway. Justice Brett Kavanaugh tested positive last week for the coronavirus so he’s going to be working from home today, participating remotely. And then, you know, of course the building, of course not taking any chances. The building is still closed to the public. Most members of the media won’t be able to attend, but you can listen to these arguments on a live stream through the court’s website. Nate?

NATE BURLESON: Jan, thank you.



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